Looks like you’re in the USA or Canada. Visit our US site Mom365 to search baby names, get offers and to connect with local Moms.

Take me there No thanks, I’ll stay here
Close
Close

For weekly personalised pregnancy and parenting emails, and lots more…

Why should you join Bounty? Here's why:

  • Four free packs full of goodies
  • Four free guides full of expert advice
  • Exclusive and personalised offers - save up to 70%!
  • Member only competitions 
pregnancy-other-conditions

Symphysis pubis dysfunction and pelvic pain

Pelvic pain in pregnancy

What is symphysis pubis dysfunction and PRGP?

Any pain or twinges in pregnancy are a huge worry for mums-to-be, yet most turn out to be totally normal and nothing to worry about. Pelvic pain is something one in five women will experience when they are expecting, and for some, it can be quite severe and debilitating.

At a glance

  • PRGP occurs when the ligaments around your pelvis soften prematurely and become too relaxed and stretchy
  • Is not harmful at all to your baby, but it could make things a bit uncomfortable for you as you try to move around
  • The pains can be in the hips, above the pubic bone, between your vagina and bottom, and down to your thighs

How it can affect you

Pelvic pain in pregnancy is known as symphysis pubis dysfunction or PRGP (pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain) and it can make every day movements such as walking up and down stairs, getting in and out of bed or up and out of a chair pretty uncomfortable.

Where does it occur?

The pains can be in the hips, above the pubic bone, between your vagina and bottom, and down to your thighs. Along with the discomfort, some women will also hear or feel clicks or grinding in their pelvis.

When does it occur?

Symphysis pubis dysfunction occurs during pregnancy when the ligaments around your pelvis soften prematurely and become too relaxed and stretchy, meaning they can no longer keep your pelvis correctly aligned.

Can it harm my baby?

SPD is not harmful at all to your baby, but it could make things a bit uncomfortable for you as you try to move around. Your midwife might refer you for physiotherapy, or suggest you wear a supportive girdle or a band of stretchy (Tubigrip) bandage to help ease your symptoms. Some women have to succumb to crutches to ease the pressure when walking.

Relieving the pain

You can take some measures to lessen the pain yourself, too – keeping your knees together when getting up and down (in a chair or in bed), for example, and sleeping with a pillow placed between your knees.

If you want to talk to someone about symphysis pubis dysfunction and get some advice or support, contact the The Pelvic Partnership 

Tips to help you cope with SPD

  • Be active but at the same time don't push yourself too hard that it causes more pain.
  • If you've been advised to do pelvic floor and tummy exercises do them religiously.
  • Don't try to do everything yourself, accept offers of help at home and ask for it if you need it.
  • Only part your legs to your pain-free range. This is a good tip to follow when getting in and out of the car, bed or bath. 
  • When lying down, pull your knees up as far as you can to help when parting your legs. If you are sitting, try arching your back and sticking your chest out before parting or moving your legs.
  • Avoid sitting cross-legged or carrying your toddler on your hip. If you feel sudden pain, stop what you're doing straight away. 
  • It is advised to sleep on your side, particularly in the third trimester, keep your legs bent and a pillow between your knees. 
  • Sit and rest regularly. If you sit on a birth ball or get down on your hands and knees, it takes the weight of your baby off your pelvis.
  • Avoid heavy lifting or pushing. Many women find the action of pushing the supermarket trolley makes the pain worse, so shop online or even better, ask someone to go and do the shop for you if you can.
  • Although it may take longer, when you're climbing stairs, take one step at a time. Step up onto one step with your best leg and then bring your other leg to meet it. Repeat with each step.
  • When you're getting dressed try to avoid standing on one leg to put on underwear or trousers, it's better to sit down to do this.

At a glance

  • PRGP occurs when the ligaments around your pelvis soften prematurely and become too relaxed and stretchy
  • Is not harmful at all to your baby, but it could make things a bit uncomfortable for you as you try to move around
  • The pains can be in the hips, above the pubic bone, between your vagina and bottom, and down to your thighs
Pelvic pain is something one in five women will experience when they are expecting

Symphysis pubis dysfunction and pelvic pain