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Gestational Diabetes

What is it? What are the symptoms? What are the treatments?

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational Diabetes is diabetes which occurs during pregnancy. It most commonly occurs during the second or third trimester. During pregnancy, your body needs to produce more insulin to make sure the sugar in your blood is broken down to be used as energy. If you're not producing enough insulin, your blood sugar levels rise and can pass to your baby. It could cause your baby to grow very big if left untreated, which can cause problems when giving birth.

What are the symptoms of Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational Diabetes often has no symptoms but is picked up during routine tests in pregnancy. It can cause symptoms such as being thirsty all the time and having a dry mouth, the need to wee more frequently, tiredness, infections such as thrush, and blurred eyesight.

What are the treatments and remedies of Gestational Diabetes?

If you have Gestational Diabetes, it can be controlled by a specific diet or insulin injections if necessary. After the birth it normally goes away on it's own, but in some mums, diabetes may remain. You will be monitored carefully during and after pregnancy to check for this.

This guide 

The information in this Bounty A-Z of Family Health is not a substitute for an examination, diagnosis or treatment by a doctor, midwife, health visitor or any other qualified health professional. If in doubt, always speak to a doctor.

Bounty will not be held responsible or liable for any injury, loss, damage, or illness, however this occurs or appears, after using the information given on this website and in particular the A-Z of Family Health.

Further help

For health advice and information 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the NHS offers call and web services. You can also visit NHS websites for services, health information and health news at nhs.uk 

  • England – call 111 from any landline or mobile phone free of charge, or visit nhs.uk 
  • Scotland – call 111 from any landline or mobile phone free of charge, or visit nhs24.com 
  • Wales – call 0845 4647 , or visit nhsdirect.wales.nhs.uk 
  • Northern Ireland – visit hscni.net

 

Gestational Diabetes