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Weaning top tips

Introducing your baby to solids: top tips from mums

No one knows weaning like mums.

Here are a few of your top tips for making weaning go smoothly.

At a glance

  • Big sisters and brothers are a big help
  • Don’t get too hung up on mess
  • Variety is the spice of life

There’s nothing like hands-on experience when it comes to looking after a baby – and weaning is no exception. Mums share how they’ve navigated their babies’ journeys to eating solid food.

Watch for the signs

I knew Laurie was ready for solid food when we took her swimming and went to the café afterwards. I looked away for a minute and the next thing I knew, she had half my flapjack in her mouth! When they’re actually grabbing your food, it’s a definite sign.

Emma, mum of 1

Don’t get too hung up on mess

I remember a mum telling me that her friend always fed her son sitting in the bath even as he got older because she couldn't stand any mess in the kitchen! That’s going a bit far, but I think having an easy-clean floor is a good idea.

Ros, mum of 2

Give them a bit of what they fancy

When she gets fed up with the main course I load the spoon with a little of that and dip the tip of the spoon into the dessert. Works every time.

Julia, mum of 3

Big sisters and brothers are a big help

Huw really enjoys Isla giving him some spoonfuls, and I usually feed him with the others so he has a couple of good (ish!) models for eating.

Eve, mum of 3

Some babies like to do it for themselves…

I remember trying Jo on 'mush', lovingly preparing freshly puréed food, and her turning her nose up at it. But then she was sitting next to a friends’ daughter a few years older who was eating a boiled egg and soldiers, and she grabbed it and tucked in. She liked food that looked like food, and feeding herself, and rejected anything that looked like mush. Had a few near-choking episodes but she survived…..!

Jill, mum of 1

…and some don’t

I tried (for about one day) baby-led weaning. Joseph ate almost nothing and made a big mess. I didn't have the patience to continue with that method.

Kath, mum of 1

Variety is the spice of life

I introduced a bit of texture by not puréeing lentil soup for very long or putting small pasta or orzo into puréed soups. To give him protein, I started to poach little bits of fish, flaking them up and giving them to Joseph with a white sauce and puréed vegetables, or a bit of vegetable soup or the poaching milk over the top.

Kath, mum of 1

Perseverance pays off…

Weaning got off to a bad start for us as Bertie had a rash after we’d just started on baby rice. The doctor gave me liquid penicillin to syringe into his mouth 4 times a day! He loathed it and started to associate me going anywhere near his mouth with medicine. So he wasn't great at eating anything for ages. In the end I discovered that he liked holding an enormous piece of toast in one hand and sucking on it, and at the same time would allow me to put little spoons of mush into his mouth.

Lou, mum of 1

At a glance

  • Big sisters and brothers are a big help
  • Don’t get too hung up on mess
  • Variety is the spice of life
When they’re actually grabbing your food, it’s a definite sign

Weaning top tips