assisted-delivery

Overdue babies and inductions

My baby is overdue – what will happen if I am induced?

Your baby is just too comfy!

If your due date has come and gone, you might be feeling fed up, uncomfortable and anxious to get things moving.

At a glance

  • Inductions are the artificial starting of labour
  • They usually happen between 7 and 14 days after your due date
  • There are different methods and you may end up having more than one

Your midwives will probably start talking induction once you get to a week over your due date, however, they might be happy to let you go to 14 days if you would prefer not to be induced, and if your baby is still happy and healthy in the womb.

What is an induction?

Induction is basically the artificial starting of labour. There are a few different methods that hospitals use to get you going, and you may end up having one or more of them.

Sweep

The most common initial approach is a 'sweep'.  This will usually be offered by your midwife at 40-41 weeks. She will give you an internal examination and use her finger to loosen the membranes around your cervix.  You might find it slightly uncomfortable and have some bloody discharge after, but around half of all mums who have a sweep will go in labour within 48 hours.

Prostaglandins

You might also be offered prostaglandins to encourage the cervix to soften and shorten and contractions to start. They need to be administered in hospital (as a tablet or a gel dispensed internally) as most mums go into labour pretty soon after having a dose.

Breaking the waters

For some overdue mums, midwives might suggest breaking the waters – or to give it its technical term, the artificial rupture of membranes (ARM). Labour usually kicks in once the waters are broken, although some women might need further help.

Syntocinon drip

For stubborn babies who are 40 weeks plus a Syntocinon drip might be suggested if all other efforts have failed – this is a synthetic version of Oxytocin, the hormone which starts labour off. It will be administered in hospital, and your baby will be constantly monitored.

If you are overdue and induction is being suggested by your midwife, talk through all the options available to you. You will still be able to stick to your birth plan in most cases, but you might want to have an open mind about what pain relief you would like, as some mums find induced labours a bit more hard going that those which have started of their own accord.

Check out our page on the natural alternatives to inducing labour if you are 40 weeks plus and fed up or speak to mums in the Bounty Community about how they coped with being overdue.

At a glance

  • Inductions are the artificial starting of labour
  • They usually happen between 7 and 14 days after your due date
  • There are different methods and you may end up having more than one
If you need to be induced, talk through all the options available to you with your midwife

Overdue babies and inductions