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health-and-wellness

Travelling when pregnant? Here’s what you need to know

Going on holiday before baby arrives? Why not. Check out these tips to help keep you and baby safe abroad

5 ways to stay safe travelling when pregnant

If you’re thinking of taking a trip during your pregnancy, these tips will help you stay safe

travelling when pregnant 474

You can’t beat a luxury break for winding down before you dive headlong into parenthood!  And with a few precautions, you can enjoy a healthy, happy holiday, and why not.  Here’s five ways to stay safe while travelling overseas.

1. Safe food and drink

Be careful about food hygiene – if you’re concerned, avoid salads, ice creams and ice cubes in drinks. Check if tap water is safe, and if in doubt, just buy bottled. If you do get ill, keep hydrated and keep eating if you can – it’s better for the baby.

2. Keep cool

Avoid getting too hot – it won’t do you or the baby any good. And make sure you protect your skin from that lovely sunshine – it’s easier to burn in pregnancy.

3. Safe flying 

If you’re flying for more five hours, there’s a small risk of blood clots - deep vein thrombosis, (DVT), so drink plenty of water and move about regularly - every 30 minutes or so. You can also buy some of those sexy support stockings to reduce any leg swelling, and boost your circulation by stretching your legs and making ankle circling movements every half an hour.

4. Check out health facilities

Research local facilities in case you need urgent attention and pack your medical records too so doctors know about your pregnancy and history. You probably won’t need any of it, but best to play it safe.

5. Consider vaccinations 

Ideally pick a destination where you don’t need jabs - it’s thought the virus or bacteria in the jab may harm the baby. Or chat to your doctor if you do need to travel further afield – jabs are far safer than the disease itself.

Top tip!

‘Pregnancy-proof’ your travel insurance 

Double check sure your policy offers you cover for essentials, like pregnancy-related medical care.

Travelling when pregnant? Here’s what you need to know