Looks like you’re in the USA or Canada. Visit our US site Mom365 to search baby names, get offers and to connect with local Moms.

Take me there No thanks, I’ll stay here
Close
Close

For weekly personalised pregnancy and parenting emails, and lots more…

Why should you join Bounty? Here's why:

  • Four free packs full of goodies
  • Four free guides full of expert advice
  • Exclusive and personalised offers - save up to 70%!
  • Member only competitions 
pregnancy-week-by-week

30 weeks pregnant

What to expect this week

What's happening in week 30 of your pregnancy

Week thirty and the countdown begins. Your baby will be here very soon!

At a glance

  • Your baby is fully developed and around 39cm
  • Pack your hospital bag with everything you will need for baby and you
  • Plan some treats for yourself before your baby is born
30 Weeks pregnant

How big is my baby at 30 weeks? 

Your baby is fully developed, but there is still some fine tuning going on as the final pieces of the intricate baby-making jigsaw are put in place!

Your baby will measure around 39cm in length now, weighing nearly 3lbs and is continuing to put on weight. Should you go into premature labour, and your baby born premature, your baby would be taken to a special care baby unit, but they would have an extremely good chance of survival.

Their little lungs are not quite mature enough to support them in the outside world at this stage, and their brain is changing appearance wise, taking on the grooves and ridges that make it look the same as an adults'. These wrinkles will increase to provide more space for brain tissue to grow and develop.

It’s likely that if they aren’t already your baby will begin to move head downward and into the ‘engaged’ position. There’s around a litre of amniotic fluid surrounding the baby, but this will decrease as they continue to grow into the final weeks.

Facts to know about your baby in week 30

  • The Lanugo hair will start to disappear as the new brain cells and fat help to regulate the body temperature for the remaining weeks in the womb
  • A pint and a half of amniotic fluid surrounds baby, but that volume will shrink as they get bigger and takes up more room in your uterus
  • Their bone marrow is also starting to produce red blood cells ready for development and growth after birth
  • Your baby’s digestive tract is now almost fully developed and will soon be ready for mouth feeding after birth



You at 30 weeks pregnant

With the end nearly in sight, it could be nice to start planning a few little treats just for yourself before your baby is born. 

Getting your hair cut so it's in a nice easy to maintain style, or going for a pedicure (unless you are one of the lucky ones who can still reach her own toes!) could be nice ways to grab a bit of 'me time' before baby arrives. Or you could just have some girlfriends over for some pampering and get them to sort your tootsies out! 

Some spas offer specific packages for mums-to-be if you are after the ultimate in indulgence – particularly lovely if someone has offered to treat you!

Facts to know about you in week 30

  • From now you only need 300 calories a day more than before you were pregnant
  • The food you eat now travels more slowly through the intestines, to allow for better absorption. This can result in drier stools and constipation
  • The pregnancy waddle is due to the fact that joints become more relaxed and the centre of gravity changes
  • Due to the go-slow in your intestines, a build-up of gas is very common. Embarrassing, we know - but often unavoidable. Drinking lots of water can help
  • Your kidneys work much harder, they have to filter more blood. Your kidneys also make more urine as you get rid of waste for two
  • You are more prone to urinary tract infections in pregnancy. Report any pain, blood or burning to your doctor

What to think about in week 30

The big question for this week is have you packed your hospital bag? Now's the time to start thinking about getting organised for when you go into labour. Getting all the bits and pieces you need for your bag now will save you having to endure the shops in the last few weeks of pregnancy (which are reserved for feet-up style relaxing before 18 years of mummy-hood begins!). 

Your hospital bag needs to contain all the things you will need for the duration of your stay, so the items you might want in labour, such as lip balm, a comfy over sized t-shirt, your TENS machine and clothes and toiletries for after the birth. You'll also need to pack for your baby too, and choose what little outfit you want to dress them in after delivery, and their going home clothes! One of the best bits of pre-baby prep!

Thinking and researching what kind of birth you want is definitely an important consideration to start thinking about now you’ve reached week 30. Whether you’re thinking of a hospital or home birth, you may have heard the term doula and wonder what it’s all about.

A doula’s role is essentially to assist you at the birth. Basically she is a woman who helps to support another woman during childbirth. The word itself comes from the ancient Greek for servant or hand maiden.

It's important not to confuse a doula’s role with that of the midwife. A doula is not medically trained and will not be there to deliver your baby, but to support you through the birth and try and help you achieve the birth you want. For many women (and their families), they play a very important part in the birth process.

Are you starting to find yourself fretting over how clean the floor is? Getting a random urge to clean the bathroom literally from top to bottom? Don’t worry, you’re not going mad, but you may be nesting.

You hear this term frequently in relation to pregnancy yet you may not be sure what it’s all about, and whether it really is a thing, but in simple terms, it’s when pregnant women, towards the end of her pregnancy, gets  a burst of energy and wants to clean and tidy her home really thoroughly. 

It’s actually been backed up by experts as in 2013 researchers at McMaster University in Canada found that the urge to nest stems from an inbuilt need in a mum to 'protect and prepare' for her unborn baby. So relax it’s quite normal, but don’t fret if it’s not struck yet either!

Found this helpful? Read more on:

Signs and symptoms

Heartburn
That dreaded heartburn could be keeping you up at night at the moment. Some ways to help ease the symptoms of heartburn include eating easily digestible food, avoiding spicy and very rich foods. Don’t eat too big a meal, smaller more frequent meals will digest easier and could help you avoid a bout of heartburn. To help the digestion process, it’s also a good idea to have plenty of fluids before, during and after eating. There are medicines available to help heartburn, but not all are suitable for pregnant women so do always talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking them.
Read more

Migraines
Around 16% of women experience a migraine for the first time during their pregnancy. If you do have a migraine rather than a tension headache you will notice a throbbing pain, typically on one side of the head. It may also give you other symptoms including nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and noise. On the other hand, around two-thirds of women who have suffered with migraines in the past say they notice their migraines improve while pregnant.
Read more

Watch our videos below: 

Video 1: Caesareans explained 

Video 2: Pain relief options

Video 3: Quinny Moodd pushchair reviewed

Baby Names

Search for a name, sibling names, middle names - or use our random name finder for some creative fun!

Baby name generator

Name meaning

Origin

At a glance

  • Your baby is fully developed and around 39cm
  • Pack your hospital bag with everything you will need for baby and you
  • Plan some treats for yourself before your baby is born

More for you